Markets Served by the Aegis System
Types of properties that can be protected by Aegis
Facilities, Industries and Customers

Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources

Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 the Department of Homeland Security developed recommendations and strategies intended to enhance the protection of our nation’s critical infrastructure and resources.  Homeland Security Presidential Directive Seven (HSPD -7), enacted December 17, 2003, established U. S. Policy for enhancing Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) protection by establishing a framework of National Infrastructure Protection partners to identify, prioritize, and protect the nation's CIKR from terrorist attacks (National Infrastructure Protection Plan - NIPP).

Identified CIKR “Sector-Specific” infrastructure and resource categories

  • Agriculture and Food
  • Banking and Finance
  • Chemical
  • Commercial Facilities
  • Communications.
  • Critical Manufacturing
  • Dams
  • Defense Industrial
  • Emergency Services
  • Energy
  • Government Facilities
  • Health Care and Public Health
  • Information Technology
  • National Monuments and Icon
  • Nuclear Reactors Materials and Waste
  • Postal and Shipping
  • Transportation Systems
  • Water

Critical Response Technologies – Facilities Served

Critical Response Technologies’ Aegis system has the ability to greatly improve the safety and security in each and every one of the critical sectors identified as CIKR by enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of first response and by taking advantage of the program’s central and peripheral methodology. Many of the Types of Facilities that we serve (listed below) are included in CIKR’s eighteen sectors, some are not, and many are underemphasized, not by intentional omission but by a lack of priority and resources.
Types of Facilities served by CRT include but are not limited to:

  • High-Rise Buildings
  • Office Complexes
  • Shopping Centers
  • Manufacturing Facilities
  • Schools (Public & Private)
  • College Campuses
  • Medical Facilities
  • Bank Branches
  • Theatres
  • Malls
  • Military Facilities
  • Port Facilities
  • Public Utility Sites
  • Universities
  • Hotels, Resorts
  • Sports Complexes
  • Financial Institutions
  • Airport Facilities
  • Public Transportation
  • Hospitals
  • Concert Halls
  • Museums
  • City, County, State, Federal Complexes
  • Any attractive “soft target” where the public congregates.

As we can see from the above lists (CIKR Sector-Specific and Types of Facilities) CRT has the ability to effectively serve all CIKR sectors as well as all types of facilities.

The complexes listed under Types of Facilities tend to fall into a particular category by general use, i.e. high-rise office buildings, office complexes and such are normally occupied by tenants who manage the administrative affairs of businesses and professions; malls, shopping centers, etc. are generally mixed use retail venues, schools, colleges and universities are educational institutions, and so on. Sector-Specific resources are just that, categories in which all types of CIKR facilities fall. 

While many of CRT’s customers and clients fall under various CIKR categories, many do not and are simply “attractive soft targets” - locations where our citizen public works, shops, worship's, seeks medical care, pursues education, enjoys recreation or simply congregates.

These venues are vulnerable to a wide range of hazards. These are the sites that are going to be the targets of not only smaller more frequent terrorist attacks but are also the sites of the more familiar and  frequent emergency incident (i.e. crime, natural and manmade disasters of varying scopes, accidents, sites of collateral/cascading damage, etc.).

Assessment of Threats

Even with the most conscientious and dedicated efforts our public safety officials they cannot be expected to protect us from all or even most threats. Not only do we have the threat of terrorism we have the constant threat of crime, natural and man-made disasters and simple accidents that can and do cause major emergency situations. Evidence of this is seen as these events play out on a daily basis as reported by our local and national media outlets. As these situations occur we can certainly rely on the dedicated professional efforts of our state and local public safety agencies to handle these incidents with the utmost efficiency and professionalism keeping these situations contained and preventing them from growing into major disasters.

The reality of our national and world situation is that there are limits to what can expect our government to control. Budgets are shrinking, resources and manpower are stretched to point that services are not just being drastically cut but simply eliminated.

Any government official, and just plain common sense, will tell you that safety and security begins with individual effort in the form of awareness and preparedness. As indicated in the DHS text below a continuous effort is underway to identify “gaps” in our security protocols and to mitigate those vulnerabilities by evolving procedures.

Refining the Response to Threats

The gap that we have identified at CRT is one that we can address and one we can significantly affect with a major boots-on-the-ground impact. That being the communications and coordination gap that exists between local public safety, the management staff of the facility in question and the citizen public that occupies that facility.  Folks this is where the rubber meets the road and a positive difference can be made.  This is where lives are saved, damage is contained, liability is minimized and public support is won.

Critical Response Technologies proposes to fill that critical communications gap with an Emergency Response System that includes preparedness planning, cutting edge critical information management, training and exercising of those plans to produce a very effective emergency response system that saves lives.

Our government will never, I repeat never be able to provide sufficient resources to address this gap.  Our government will never be able to protect us from or prevent all hazardous situations that may occur. It is up to us to prepare and respond effectively at a more basic and manageable the ground level.    

For informational purposes we have included text (below), as published by the Department of Homeland Security, explaining the formation of the Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources program developed in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and enacted on 17 December 2003.

This is only one element of a coordinated effort that our government has undertaken to protect us from future attacks. The Department of Homeland Security has done an outstanding job in its protection of our country from subsequent major terrorist attacks. There have been none. Credit for this major accomplishment is owed in no small part to the directives, framework, organization and tenants of CIKR. These are, however, not the only hazards requiring attention, the veritable tip of the iceberg.

Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR)*

Importance of Protecting the Nation's Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources

Protecting and ensuring the continuity of the critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) of the United States are essential in the nation's security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life.

Critical infrastructure are in the assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, so vital to the United States that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, public health or safety, or any combination thereof. Key resources are publicly or privately controlled resources essential to the minimal operations of the economy and government.

Homeland Security Presidential Directive Seven (HSPD -7, enacted December 17, 2003) established U. S. Policy for enhancing CIKR protection by establishing a framework of National Infrastructure Protection (National Infrastructure Protection Plan - NIPP) partners to identify, prioritize, and protect the nation's CIKR from terrorist attacks. The directive identified 17 CIKR sectors and designated a federal Sector-Specific Agency (SSA) to lead CIKR protection efforts in each. The directive allows for the Department of Homeland Security to identify gaps in existing CIKR sectors and establish new sectors to fill the gaps. Under this authority, the Department established an 18th sector, the Critical Manufacturing Sector, in March of 2008.

Each of the Sector-Specific Agencies developed a Sector-Specific Plan that details the application of the NIPP framework to the unique characteristics of their sector.

Importance of CIKR protection

Attacks on the nation’s CIKR could significantly disrupt the functioning of government and business alike and produce cascading effects far beyond the targeted sector and physical location of the incident. Direct terrorist attacks and natural, man-made, or technological hazards could produce catastrophic losses in terms of human casualties, property destruction, and economic effects, as well as profound damage to public morale and confidence.

Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sectors

  • Agriculture and Food
  • Banking and Finance
  • Chemical
  • Commercial Facilities
  • Communications.
  • Critical Manufacturing
  • Dams
  • Defense Industrial
  • Emergency Services
  • Energy
  • Government Facilities
  • Health Care and Public Health
  • Information Technology
  • National Monuments and Icon
  • Nuclear Reactors Materials and Waste
  • Postal and Shipping
  • Transportation Systems
  • Water

* Some text taken from Department of Homeland Security materials.